Nearly a decade ago, Natalie Giorgi died at Camp Sacramento of an allergic reaction to peanuts when she bit into a dessert that had been prepared with a peanut product.Natalie’s parents had made staff aware of her peanut allergy.Four years later, 3-year old Elijah Silvera died after a child care worker in New York fed him a grilled cheese sandwich. His parents said they had submitted documentation to staff that their son was allergic to dairy. “This is something very near and dear to our heart because we don’t want another parent to suffer,” said Thomas Silvera, Elijah’s father. “It’s a phone call that a parent doesn’t want to receive from your child’s school.” Dina and Thomas Silvera led a push to create Elijah’s Law. That legislation now requires child care facilities to take concrete steps to manage food allergy training and education standards, including emergency response protocols, in New York The Silveras have also created an online tool kit to inspire other states to adopt similar laws.Natalie’s parents, Joanne and Louis Giorgi are partnering with Elijah’s parents, as well as a Stockton lawmaker, to push for California to enact a similar proposal in California.AB 2042 was introduced by Assemblymember Carlos Villapudua, D-Stockon. “You do not want someone else to suffer what you have when you can have training in place and you can make a difference, “said Joanne Giorgi, Natalie’s mother. “It’s almost indescribable in words. You do whatever you can to make sure another family doesn’t suffer the same loss.” The bill is awaiting assignment in committee.

Nearly a decade ago, Natalie Giorgi died at Camp Sacramento of an allergic reaction to peanuts when she bit into a dessert that had been prepared with a peanut product.

Natalie’s parents had made staff aware of her peanut allergy.

Four years later, 3-year old Elijah Silvera died after a child care worker in New York fed him a grilled cheese sandwich. His parents said they had submitted documentation to staff that their son was allergic to dairy.

“This is something very near and dear to our heart because we don’t want another parent to suffer,” said Thomas Silvera, Elijah’s father. “It’s a phone call that a parent doesn’t want to receive from your child’s school.”

Dina and Thomas Silvera led a push to create Elijah’s Law. That legislation now requires child care facilities to take concrete steps to manage food allergy training and education standards, including emergency response protocols, in New York.

The Silveras have also created an online tool kit to inspire other states to adopt similar laws.

Natalie’s parents, Joanne and Louis Giorgi are partnering with Elijah’s parents, as well as a Stockton lawmaker, to push for California to enact a similar proposal in California.

AB 2042 was introduced by Assemblymember Carlos Villapudua, D-Stockon.

“You do not want someone else to suffer what you have when you can have training in place and you can make a difference,” said Joanne Giorgi, Natalie’s mother. “It’s almost indescribable in words. You do whatever you can to make sure another family doesn’t suffer the same loss.”

The bill is awaiting assignment in committee.

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